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San Juan Islands, Washington State, United States
A society formed in 2009 for the purpose of collecting, preserving, celebrating, and disseminating the maritime history of the San Juan Islands and northern Puget Sound area. Check this log for tales from out-of-print publications as well as from members and friends. There are circa 500, often long entries, on a broad range of maritime topics; there are search aids at the bottom of the log. Please ask for permission to use any photo posted on this site. Thank you.

1896 ❖ CHINESE WORKERS FOR THE CANNERY ❖

GEORGE E. STARR
 85610
Built in 1879 by J.F.T. Mitchell Shipyard, Seattle.
Abandoned in Lake Union in 1921.
148.2' x 28.0' x 8.7'
Single-cylinder walking-beam steam engine. Rated 143 tons.
Propulsion by sidewheels.
She served Puget Sound, Strait of Georgia, Admiralty Inlet, 
Strait of Juan de Fuca, Alaska, Columbia River.
Original photo from the archives of the S.P.H.S.©

The S.S. GEORGE E. STARR made her initial run on the UTOPIA's old route, viz: Tacoma and Seattle to Vancouver via, the San Juan Islands, last Monday. She left Seattle at midnight Sunday night and arrived here early Monday morning. She had aboard about 100 [Chinese] men, 45 for the Island Packing Co, of this place, and 55 en route to the Alaska Packers Association canneries at Point Roberts. The tin that had been expected for several days past, arrived on the LYDIA THOMPSON yesterday and the Chinese will at once begin the work of making the tin cans to be used for the season's pack. The tin, that comes from Liverpool, England, by sailing vessel around the Horn, arrived at Astoria several days ago and came from there by rail to Seattle and here by the steamer THOMPSON. The STARR will make one round trip a week calling here both ways, and will likely run all summer. The UTOPIA has been put on the Seattle-Alaska route, and started on her first trip a few days ago. 
The Islander newspaper. 9 April 1896

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