"Of all national assets, archives are the most precious:
they are the gift of one generation to another,
and the extent of our care of them marks the
extent of our civilization." Arthur Doughty.

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San Juan Islands, Washington State, United States
A society formed in 2009 for the purpose of collecting, preserving, celebrating, and disseminating the maritime history of the San Juan Islands and northern Puget Sound area. Check this log for tales from out-of-print publications as well as from members and friends. There are circa 500, often long entries, on a broad range of maritime topics; there are search aids at the bottom of the log. Please ask for permission to use any photo posted on this site. Thank you.

03 April 2017

❖ MOSQUITO FLEET MONDAY ❖ STEAMER F. G. REEVE

F. G. REEVE
214043
1916-1938
Photograph by James A. Turner, Seattle.
Undated original from the archives of the S.P.H.S.©
This wooden steamer was built by John Martinolich (1877-1960) at Dockton, WA for passengers on the Washington Route of Capt. F.G. Reeve. 
Gross tons 87; Net tons 49.
101.7' x 22.5' x 6.4'
Her 325 HP triple-expansion engine was originally in the INLAND FLYER. 
Dockton Drydock
A few years before the building of the F.G. REEVE.
Undated litho card from the archives of S.P.H.S.©
"The village of Dockton, located on Quartermaster Harbor, formed one of the first major settlements on Maury Island; an industrial center of the south Puget Sound for a brief period in the 1890s. Dockton was named by the Puget Sound Dry Dock Co which had a shipyard and drydock (the largest on the west coast) there from 1892 to 1909.
      The shipbuilding and repair activities continued at Dockton with the Stucky and Martinolich yards producing boats until 1929 when the Jane G, the last commercial boat built at Dockton, was launched.
      As shipbuilding began to decline after the dry dock moved in 1909, Dockton began a slow gradual transformation into the quiet backwater community it is today." From: Vashon-Maury Island Heritage Association.

1922: F.G. REEVE, out of documentation.
1938: The F.G. REEVE was sold and her machinery & fittings were removed. The hull was abandoned in Lake Union.
1950s: During this decade, Cleo Crawford of Shaw Island, saw the vessel getting closer to the ship breakers and talked Foss Tug into towing the hull to the mud in front of the Crawford home in Blind Bay, San Juan Islands. It is not known what plans Cleo had in mind, but the vessel rotted away there, visible for many years along the eastern shore just south of the State ferry landing. 
      Not much of a story for the short life of the F.G. REEVE. If you have more feel free to contribute.
Capt. F. G. REEVE
Aboard the CHIPPEWA
17 May 1939
Original photo from the archives of the S.P.H.S.©



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